Photos and the City

Slow travel & photography

It´s been a long day already, but there was one more thing I wanted to do – the Isle of Birsay, which one only can visit during low tide. But right next to the pathway, or better said, nearby is the Earl´s Palace and invites for a short visit.

 

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

It was the residence of Robert Stewart, half-brother of Mary Queen of Scots, who became Earl of Orkney in the late 1500s.

The palace’s use was short-lived, however: built between 1569 and 1574, its story effectively ended with the overthrow of the Stewart earls in 1615. An inventory drawn up by Oliver Cromwell’s troops in 1653 suggests neglect had already set in, and by 1700 the palace was roofless and decaying. (Historic Enviroment)

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

Built between 1569 and 1574 by Robert Stewart who created Earl of Orkney, Lord of Shetland and Knight of Birsay in 1581 by his nephew, James VI.

The palace complex was entered via an elaborate southern entrance, and ranged around the courtyard were four ranges of two-storey buildings. Three-storey towers projected from the corners.

On the ground floor were service rooms, while the upper floors, comprising two halls, chambers and a gallery, were reserved for the earl. (Historic Enviroment)

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

Robert ruled like a tyrant and in 1593 was succeeded by his son Patrick, who practised similar ruthless tactics until he was arrested in 1609. But again his son Robert tried to cling to power. In 1614 he recaptured the palace and marched on Orkney’s capital, Kirkwall, seizing the Earl’s Palace there.

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

But Robert was captured too and both men, father and son, were executed om early 1615.

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

Today the ruins of the Palace are a lovely place to visit and even have a picnic, there is a honesty box (more a cabinet), filled with delicious things,  right next to the palace. The views over the Bay of Birsay are stunning.

And maybe you will also meet this lovely watch-cat:

Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.Visiting the Earl´s Palace of Birsay in Orkney and meeting a watch-cat.

Visiting the Italian Chapel in Orkney built by Italian POW during World War II.

The Italian Chapel in Orkney, built on the Island Lamb Holm by Italian prisoners of war, is a very special reminder of hard times.

In October 1939 a German submarine under the command of Gunther Prien entered Scapa Flow and sank the British battleship ‘HMS Royal Oak’ with the loss of 834 lives. Winston Churchill, First Sea Lord at that time, visited Orkney and it was decided to build barriers to close off four entrances to Scapa Flow.

In January 1942 over a thousand Italian prisoners of war were brought to Orkney to help built the Churchill Barriers. But it was forbidden to have POWs work in military projects, so the barriers were declared to be needed causeways linking the south-eastern islands of Orkney, which they do till today.

Visiting the Italian Chapel in Orkney built by Italian POW during World War II.

It was a hard life for all the workers on the barriers, many died during the construction works. The POWs lived in Nissan Huts in Camps on the islands. The Italian Chapel and a statue of George slaying the dragon are a reminder of Camp 60.

Camp 60 housed 550 Italian prisoners from January 1942 until September 1944. The camp had 13 huts and

which the Italians improved with concrete paths (concrete was never in short supply during the construction of the Churchill Barriers) and gardens, complete with flower beds and vegetable plots. (Undiscovered Sotland)

Domenico Chiocchetti, one of the prisoners, built the statue of George slaying the dragon in the middle of the camp out of barbed wire and concrete. The Italians also built a theatre and a recreation hut, complete with three billiard tables, all built with concrete.

But what was really missing for Camp 60 was a chapel – when the camp got a new commander in 1943, Major T.P. Buckland, the Italians proposed the building of a chapel out of two small huts.

Visiting the Italian Chapel in Orkney built by Italian POW during World War II.

The work of turning the Nissen huts into a chapel fell to the prisoners themselves, led once more by Domenico Chiocchetti. The interior of the east end was lined with plasterboard and Chiocchetti started work on what is now the sanctuary. The altar and its fittings were made from concrete and were flanked by two windows made from painted glass. The gold curtains either side of the altar were purchased from a company in Exeter using the prisoners’ own funds. (Undiscovered Scotland)

Chiocchetti painted the inside of the Chapel like a work of art, still taking your breath away today.

Domenico Chiocchetti carried in his pocket a small prayer card given to him by his mother before he left his home in Italy, and it was the image on that card of the Madonna and Child by Nicolo Barabino that Chiocchetti based his painting above the altar in the Chapel. When the Camp Commander, Major Buckland, realised that the prisoner was a very talented artist he was allowed to continue painting to make the building more attractive. (Orkney.com)

 

Another prisoner, Giuseppe Palumbi, who had been a blacksmith in Italy before the war, spent four months constructing the wrought iron rood screen, which still complements the rest of the interior today. (Undiscovered Scotland)

Visiting the Italian Chapel in Orkney built by Italian POW during World War II.

Working on the chapel took a long time, the Italian Chapel wasn´t even fully finished when the Italians left the island on 9 September 1944, only Chiocchetti stayed to finish the works.

Before the Italians departed the Lord Lieutenant of Orkney, who also owned Lamb Holm, promised that the Orcadians would look after the chapel they had created. (Undiscovered Scotland)

Even though the rest of the camps were demolished, the Chapel survived and soon became a visitor attraction. In 1958 a preservation committee was formed and in 1960 the BBC funded the travels for Chiocchetti to come back to Orkney and restore his painting works.

Domenico Chiocchetti returned to Orkney again in 1964 with his wife, and gifted to the chapel the 14 wooden stations of the cross on view today. In 1992, 50 years after the Italians were originally brought to Orkney, 8 of the former prisoners returned, though Chiocchetti was too ill to be with them. Domenico Chiocchetti died on 7 May 1999 in his home village of Moena, aged 89. (Undiscovered Scotland)

Visiting the Italian Chapel in Orkney built by Italian POW during World War II.

A strong friendship with the town of Moena in Italy, the home of Chiocchetti, and Orkney still remains today. Chiocchettis daughter Letizia is an Honorary President of the Preservation Committee.

Antonella Papa, a restoration artist from Rome, who had previously done work in the Sistine Chapel, has also spent time working in the Chapel to refresh areas of Chiocchetti’s painting. (Orkney.com)