Photos and the City

Slow travel & photography

After a lovely morning in Stornoway, I drove to Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula, northeast of Stornoway and ending in Tiupam Head.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

The perfect spot for a little walk, as usual, I followed the directions from WalkingHighlands, with just a few minor changes.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

Stunning views of Harris under the clouds.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

And more stunning views over the peninsula and Lewis – they just got more beautiful along the way.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

Waking around Tiupam Head on the Eye peninsula near Stornoway.

It was a rainy day on the border between Harris and Lewis, but it looked a bit drier in Stornoway, so I decided to visit this lovely town another time. I also toyed with the idea of getting some wellies.

I was lucky, as soon as I crossed some of the mountains the sun came out.

Walking around Stornoway in Lewis, Outer Hebrides.

I started my walk around town in the harbour and discovered this impressive monument remembering the sinking of the Iolaire on 1 January 1919 right in the Minch before Stornoway. One of the worst maritime disasters in United Kingdom waters.

This monument was erected for the 100th anniversary of the sinking.

Walking around Stornoway in Lewis, Outer Hebrides.

A friendly fisherman greeting you on the other side of the harbour, vis a vis from Lews castle.

Walking around Stornoway in Lewis, Outer Hebrides.

The brewery at the edge of the world seemed to have moved…

Walking around Stornoway in Lewis, Outer Hebrides.

Another ferry arrived and brought lots of happy tourists ready to explore Harris & Lewis.

Walking around Stornoway in Lewis, Outer Hebrides.

And one of my favourite statues in Stornoway, the “Herring Girl”, or better said one of the “Herring Girls” statues – remembering all the women working in the fishing industry. For almost 100 years, from 1850 up to WWII, more than 3000 of the island’s women were employed in the industry as “Herring Girls”.